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Ramadan, Rumi, and Love

By Zeshan Zafar

Sunset. Ramadan 2015.  Iphotography.

Sunset. Ramadan 2015.
Iphotography.

It is part of life to have a difference of opinion with various individuals or groups of people. Terry Tempest Williams, in one of her books, states, “Most of all, difference of opinions are opportunities of learning.”

However, generally speaking, on many occasions, when this occurs, if one doesn’t manage it well or lacks comportment, the result can turn into a feeling of animosity. Furthermore, when uncontrolled, it can turn into hatred, a spiritual disease that sits at the core of one’s heart, dictating and defining one’s behaviour unbeknown to oneself.

When such hatred sets into our way of life, individuals choose to deal with it in a variety of ways. Some try to mask the emotion or seek validation for that hatred; others seek revenge or violent harm with devastating consequences to those they may have loved unconditionally at one time. We also see the modern phenomenon of social media being used to spread this hatred, unfairly sowing the seeds of doubts that stick and label many unfortunate individuals with “justified” gossip becoming an accepted discussion on each of our tables.

Such behaviour has unfortunately broken down many marriages, families, friendships, communities, business partners, etc. as this trait continues to become rampant to the point that we no longer discern the goodness and sacrifices that many still work towards in our respective communities, regardless of our opinions. Instead, we tend to sideline them and bad mouth them, thinking we are safe to share statements against people in the confines of our close circles, yet at the same time we do not realise the terrible human beings we are all becoming through the mismanagement of this emotion.

One of my teachers once said in one of his lectures, “Do not have a crablike mentality whereby when crabs are put in a bucket together, each one tries to escape by pulling the other one down, just to escape themselves, leading to collective demise.” This is exactly what hatred is doing to the development and growth of our communities in times when our real challenges are elsewhere and which we should all really be focusing our energies on. Unfortunately, we cry out emotional slogans such as “Muslim Unity” without realising that little can be changed without changing oneself.

One of the most notable scholars and thinkers of Islam, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf, recently shared a profound insight from the Qur’an that states, “Indeed, God will not change the condition of a people until they change what is in themselves.” He stated that our community is besot by changing the world whilst forgetting the simple hard rule of changing oneself, and that the role of changing the condition of people as a collective is the role of God. So if we all focused on changing ourselves first, ridding ourselves of our hatred for one another and purifying our own hearts, God will take care of the rest.

The question arises, how can we move beyond this hatred and begin to remove this infection so that goodness can be achieved in the short time we tread on this earth, with the invaluable gift we have been given of life?

Many have their own mechanisms of dealing with this. Recently, whilst on a journey to the States, a dear friend of mine gave me valuable and practical advice on a way to manage such tendencies, by making a conscientious and sincere effort to reach out to individuals you feel you have wronged, or who you feel wronged you, or who seem distant to you. He suggested making a prayer for them to rid your heart of antagonistic presumptions by reaching out to them on a weekly basis, until all that is contained or constricts your heart disappears until you only have mahabba (love) for that person.

The Muslim community as a whole is known to be a giving community, especially when it comes to charity and hospitality, and they continue to hold tight to the noble virtues that are fast disappearing in a globalised world. Yet charity as described by our Prophet (peace be upon him) is also through actions and good deeds: hence being altruistic through your generosity, kindness, compassion, and time are equally important. Letting go of the self is important to move away at an individual level, especially in a world where the “self” has become a dictator over our natural inclination of moderation. Many argue over the ownership of ideas and whether certain ideas are relevant and can work. The best advice I was given was to let people learn from their mistakes but to not cause further rift that our communities are regularly torn by. Instead, you must choose the incision point that you feel can best help and support individuals that you perhaps disagree with, as our commonalities are far greater than our differences.

For those who feel they do not need help from someone sincerely trying to offer their support or help, remember even if such advice is not appropriate or compatible with your aims, never ignore it. You will always find a time when such advice can be found to be valuable at a different stage of your life or applicable to a different situation.

This is what distinguishes people of wisdom, such as Shaykh Abdallah Bin Bayyah, who represents someone that keeps love at the centre of how he lives (may Allah grant him good health and a long life), through his acts of consistency. He epitomises renewal in his scholarship, but, more importantly, through his self-discipline and observance, he embodies renewal in his character. He is someone who knows not of hatred. He is someone who cannot but love and be objective to those who may be fierce critics or who oppose him or his approach. What struck me in my observances of the Shaykh is that despite any animosity shown to him, he always takes the time to listen and offer his help as he would to those who are amongst his family. This is evident in the Shaykh’s writings and rulings that speak with kindness, graciousness, and nobility of the other. I am sure everyone can relate to an individual out there who embodies such prophetic characteristics, and if you can, do not be ashamed to acknowledge your shortfalls before making that effort of change required by those who inspire you.

As Ramadan makes its yearly entrance into our homes, lives, and hearts, this is what I will be aiming to strive for, being mindful and realistic that things do not happen over night. I hope others can have mercy with me and forgive me for any wrongdoing. Imam Shafi’i famously said, “Be hard on yourself and easy on others,” noting that our God is a God that is all-merciful and all-forgiving; these are utterances that we grow up on and repeat daily.

So if your heart has flipped once, let it flip repeatedly until you have nothing but love for those who are around you. This can be achieved only by empathising. Ramadan Kareem. I will leave you with the words of Mawlana Jalal ad-Din Rumi:

“Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it.”

Zeshan Zafar is the Director of the Forum for Promoting Peace in Muslim Societies and is currently based in Abu Dhabi. 

I have been going through Shaykh Hamza Yusuf’s commentary on the Miracles of the Qu’ran from chapter 6 of the Burda by Imam al-Busiri this Ramadan (1435/2014), and thought I would share the links to the recordings here so others can also benefit inshaAllah ta’Ala.  In addition to the actual commentary, in part 6, towards the end (play from 42:00 onwards), Shaykh Hamza recites the English translation of the Du’a al-Nasiri (Prayer of the Oppressed) by Shaykh Muhammad Ibn Nasir, it’s really beautiful to listen to and reflect upon, especially in these difficult times. 

Part 1:

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6

 

 

The Prophet (salla’Allahu ‘alayhi wasalam) is reported to have said, “Whoever stands up (in worship) in the nights preceding the two Eids expecting rewards from his Lord, his heart will not die when the other hearts will die”. (Ibn Majah)

“It had been the practice of the Prophet (salla’Allahu ‘alayhi wasalam) that he would not sleep in the night preceding the day of Eid-ul-fitr. This night has been named in a Hadith as the Night of Reward (Lailatul Jaiza). The Almighty bestows His rewards on those who have spent the month of Ramadan abiding by the dictates of Shari’ah, and all their prayers in this night are accepted. To benefit from this opportunity, one should perform as much worship in this night as he can, and should pray for all his needs and desires.”

“When it is the last night [of Ramadan], they are forgiven, all of them.”
So a man from the people said, “Is it the Night of Power?” And the Prophet (Allah bless him and grant him peace) replied, “No, do you not see that if laborers work, when they finish their tasks, they are given their wages?” – Bayhaqi (taken from Shaykh AbdulKarim Yahya’s Facebook status!)

And your Lord says, “Call upon Me; I will respond to you.” [40:60]

The worst type of love is unrequited love: when you love somebody and they don’t love you – there is nothing worst than that in the world, unrequited love. And obviously the worst type of unrequited love is with God, because we want the Love of God. ~ Shaykh Hamza Yusuf.

“Allahumma inni asaluka hubbak(a), wa hubba may yuhibuk(a), wa l-amala ‘lladhi yuballighuni hubbak(a)”

O Allah! I beg of You Your love and the love of those who love You and I ask of You such deeds which will bring me Your love. (Tirmidhi)

“Indeed, We sent the Qur’an down during the Night of Decree.

And what can make you know what is the Night of Decree?

The Night of Decree is better than a thousand months.

The angels and the Spirit descend therein by permission of their Lord for every matter.

Peace it is until the emergence of dawn.” Sura 97 (Al-Qadr)

Imam al-Razi stated:

“Allah (subhanahu wa ta`ala – exalted is He) concealed this night like He did with many things: He concealed His pleasure with acts of obedience so one will strive towards them all, the answer to supplications so one will work towards making every supplication matter, His greatest name so people will magnify all of His names, His acceptance of repentance so one will repent for every sin, the time of one’s death so one will use his entire life for worship and He hid this night so people will worship Him every night [from the last 10 nights of Ramadan].” [Tafsir al-Kabir] (taken from Imam Suhaib Webb’s blog)

The Prophet Muhammad (Allah bless him and give him peace) said, “Whoever prays on Laylat al-Qadr out of faith and sincerity, shall have all their past sins forgiven.” [Bukhari and Muslim, from Abu Hurayra (Allah be pleased with him)]

Please keep me and my loved ones in your most cherished duas!

Aisha, may Allah be pleased with her, said: I asked the Messenger of Allah: ‘O Messenger of Allah, if I know what night is the night of Qadr, what should I say during it?’ He said: ‘Say: O Allah, You are pardoning and You love to pardon, so pardon me.’ “(Ahmad, Ibn Majah, and Tirmidhi).

The transliteration of this Dua is “Allahumma innaka ‘afuwwun tuhibbul ‘afwa fa’fu ‘annee”

“Whoever Allah destines for endless bliss and endless happiness, He teaches two things:

1- Happiness that lasts forever is more important and more significant than happiness that passes away.

2. You will never be happy so long as you condition with your happiness with something that is bound to perish”

Shaykh Nuh Ha Mim Keller

“It is astonishing how people can influence others, simply by keeping their company. Don’t take a companion unless their state elevates you, and that they take you closer to God. Don’t have friends that complain all the time. There’s nothing worse than to be around a complainer. Be around people that uplift you, that are positive, optimistic. Help people with their problems, but put yourself in environments that help you move forward. And don’t be of the people out there that don’t want to see others succeed.”
– Ustadh Yahya Rhodus

Jummah Mubarak! Allahumma sali ‘ala sayyidina Muhammad

Said Ibn Bilal said

“Despite committing a sin, Allah still bestows four blessings on His sinful servant:

He does not cut off his sustenance,

He does not cause his health to deteriorate

He does not make the sin apparent on him for all to see

and He does not hasten his punishment.”

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